Favorite Television Productions Set in the 1940s

Below is a list of my favorite television productions (so far) that are set in the 1940s:

FAVORITE TELEVISION PRODUCTIONS SET IN THE 1940s

1. “Homefront” (1991-1993) – Lynn Marie Latham and Bernard Lechowick created this award-winning series about the residents of a small Ohio town in post-World War II.

2. “Mob City” (2013) – Jon Bernthal starred in this six-part limited series that was inspired by John Buntin’s book, “L.A. Noir: The Struggle for the Soul of America’s Most Seductive City”. Co-starring Alexa Davalos and Milo Ventimiglia, the series was created by Frank Darabont.

3. “Agent Carter” (2015-2016) – Hayley Atwell starred as Margaret “Peggy” Carter, an agent with the Strategic Scientific Reserve (SSR) in the post-World War II Manhattan. Created by Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely, the MCU series co-starred James D’Arcy and Enver Gjokaj.

4a. “Band of Brothers” (2001) – Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks produced this outstanding television miniseries about the history of a U.S. Army paratrooper company – “Easy Company” – during the war. Damian Lewis and Ron Livingston starred. (tie)

4b. “The Pacific” (2010) – Spielberg and Hanks struck gold again in this equally superb television miniseries about the experiences of three U.S. Marines – John Basilone, Robert Leckie and Eugene Sledge – in the war’s Pacific Theater. James Badge Dale, Joseph Mazzello and Jon Seda starred. (tie)

5. “Manhattan” (2014-2015) – Sam Shaw created this series about the creation of the first two atomic bombs at Los Alamitos, New Mexico. The series starred John Benjamin Hickey.

6. “The Winds of War” (1983) – Dan Curtis produced and directed this television adaptation of Herman Wouk’s 1971 novel. The seven-part miniseries starred Robert Mitchum, Ali McGraw and Jan-Michael Vincent.

7. “Pearl” (1978) – Stirling Silliphant wrote this three-part miniseries about a group of men and women who experienced the attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941. Angie Dickinson, Robert Wagner, Lesley-Ann Warren and Dennis Weaver starred.

8. “The Jewel in the Crown” (1984) – The ITV aired this award winning television adaptation of Paul Scott’s “Raj Quartet” novels (1965–75) about the end of the British Raj in India. The fourteen-part miniseries starred Art Malik, Geraldine James, Charles Dance and Tim Pigott-Smith.

9. “Foyle’s War” (2002-2015) – Anthony Horowitz created this television crime drama about a British police detective during World War II. The series starred Michael Kitchen, Honeysuckle Weeks and Anthony Howell.

10. “RKO 281” (1999) – Liev Schreiber starred as Orson Welles in this 1999 television adaptation of 1996 documentary called “The Battle Over Citizen Kane”. The television movie also starred John Malkovich, Roy Schneider, James Cromwell and Melanie Griffith.

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Five Favorite Episodes of “THE FLASH” Season One (2014-2015)

Below is a list of my five favorite episodes from Season One of the CW series, “THE FLASH”.  Created by Greg Berlanti, Geoff Johns, and Andrew Kreisberg; the series stars Grant Gustin as Barry Allen aka the Flash:

 

FIVE FAVORITE EPISODES OF “THE FLASH” SEASON ONE (2014-2015)

1.  (1.15) “Out of Time” – A meta-human criminal named Mark Mardon returns to Central City to seek revenge against Barry Allen aka the Flash’s guardian, Detective Joe West.

 

 

 

2.  (1.23) “Fast Enough” – In this season finale, Barry Allen contemplates on going back in time fifteen years earlier to prevent his nemesis, Eobard Thawne aka Reverse-Flash, from killing his mother.

 

 

 

3.  (1.13) “Nuclear Man” – Team Flash attempt to help scientist Dr. Martin Stein and STAR Labs engineer Ronnie Raymond, whose atoms have been in conflict ever since the lab accident.  The team discovers that their merged bodies forms into a being with a powerful fire power.  Meanwhile, Joe enlists the help of STAR Labs’ other engineer, Cisco Ramon, to investigate Nora Allen’s murder.

 

 

 

4.  (1.07) “Power Outage” – While the Flash’s speed is drained by a meta-human with electrical energy, a murderous thief named William Tockman aka the Clock King holds Joe, his fellow cops and his daughter Iris hostage at the police station.

 

 

 

5.  (1.10) “Revenge of the Rogues” – Thief Leonard Snart aka Captain Cold makes a second appearance in Central City with a new partner in tow, Mick Rory aka Heatwave.  Snart and Rory hope to set a trap for the Flash in order to prevent the latter from interfering in a heist.

 

 

 

Honorable Mention – (1.17) “Tricksters” – Twenty years ago, a criminal named Jesse James aka the Trickster terrorized Central Ctity.  A copycat has appeared to carry on the original criminal’s misdeeds.  Flashbacks reveal how the Reverse Flash assumed the persona of Harrison Wells, owner of STAR Labs.

 

 

 

 

“JACK REACHER: NEVER GO BACK” (2016) Review

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“JACK REACHER: NEVER GO BACK” (2016) Review

Four years after the release of the 2012 hit, “JACK REACHER”, Tom Cruise starred in a second movie featuring the main character in “JACK REACHER: NEVER GO BACK”. The movie is an adaptation of Lee Childs’ 2013 novel, “Never Go Back”

Directed by Edward Zwick, who worked with Cruise in the 2003 movie “THE LAST SAMURAI”“JACK REACHER: NEVER GO BACK”begins with former Army officer-turned vigilante drifter setting up a small town law officer to be arrested for human trafficking. It turns out that this latest case was one of several in which he had been assisting an Army officer named Major Susan Turner. When he finally arrives in Washington D.C. to meet her, Reacher discovers from a Colonel Sam Morgan that Turner had been accused of espionage and arrested. Turner’s attorney, Colonel Bob Moorcroft, later reveals that Turner might be involved in the murder of two soldiers in Afghanistan. Reacher believes that Turner has been framed. He also learns from Moorcroft that an old acquaintance named Candice Dayton has filed a paternity suit against him, claiming that he is the father of her 15 year-old daughter Samantha.

When Moorcroft is murdered by an unknown assassin, Reacher is blamed, arrested and transported to the same prison where Turner is being detained. Assassins arrive to kill her, but Reacher rescues Turner and the pair escape and make their way to Morgan’s home upon realizing that he is a part of the conspiracy. Unfortunately, following their meeting with Morgan, the latter is murdered by the assassin. Worse, Reacher and Turner’s enemies become aware of Samantha and try to use her as a means to control the former. Reacher and Turner intervene before the adolescent girl could be snatched. With Samantha in tow, the pair set out to discover the details behind the conspiracy that has framed both of them; and evade an Army unit led by one Captain Anthony Espin, who was under Turner’s command.

After watching this movie in the theaters, I had overheard another theater patron claim that the 2012 movie was better. Apparently, many critics seemed to share the guy’s feelings since the movie had garnered mixed reviews. And yet . . . I personally found it hard to share their views. I would not say that “NEVER GO BACK” was better than “JACK REACHER”. But I do not believe it was inferior to the other film. However, I am not going to waste my time in examining why others believe it was the inferior of the two films. After all, what is the point?

I certainly had no problem with the film’s production values. “JACK REACHER: NEVER GO BACK” was set in Washington D.C. and New Orleans. As someone who has always enjoyed visiting both cities, I must say that Oliver Wood’s sharp and colorful photography did justice to both cities. I also impressed by Billy Weber’s film editing. I thought his work was especially impressive in the sequence that featured Reacher breaking Turner out of a military jail and the pair’s attempt to save Samantha from the mysterious assassin during a Mardi Gras parade on the streets of New Orleans.

But like the 2012 movie, “JACK REACHER: NEVER GO BACK” had a well-written plot that I found intriguing. What I found interesting about this story is that the actual crime(s) that kick-started the story had occurred before the movie’s first reel – namely the murder of two U.S. Army soldiers in Afghanistan, who had been investigating a military contractor on her unit’s behalf. Thanks to the script written by Zwick, Richard Wenk and Marshall Herskovitz; I came to the conclusion that the movie had been set up to resemble a cold case. While Reacher and Turner struggle to evade arrest by a pursuing Captain Espin or murder by the mysterious assassin . . . and take care of the young Samantha, they also investigate the two soldiers’ murders. The entire scenario seems to be one balancing act.

If I must be brutally honest, I do have one problem with the story. “NEVER GO BACK” started with Reacher helping Turner arrest a lawman for human trafficking. I never understood why an Army officer would be involved in such a case in the first place. It seemed like one for the F.B.I. More importantly, Reacher and Turner had yet to meet face-to-face. Unless a piece of dialogue had evaded me, the movie never explained how the pair became acquainted with each other in the first place. I understand that they had first became aware of each other in one of Lee Childs’ previous “Jack Reacher” novels. But I wish the movie’s screenplay had been more clear about the matter in this film.

The performances featured in “JACK REACHER: NEVER GO BACK” struck me as pretty first-rate. Tom Cruise did his usual excellent job in portraying the ex-military vigilante. He was ably supported by Cobie Smulders’ excellent performance as Army officer Major Susan Turner, who seemed outraged by the criminal charges against her. Both Cruise and Smulders had one great scene in which their characters argued over who would remain in their New Orleans hotel to guard Samantha, while the other conduct their investigation. I found their performances rather entertaining to watch.

The movie also featured solid performances from Aldis Hodge, who portrayed the pursuing young and intense Army officer Captain Anthony Espin; Patrick Heusinger as the ruthless and barely stoppable assassin; Holt McCallany as the corrupt Colonel Sam Morgan; Austin Hebert as former soldier-turned-homeless drug addict Daniel Prudhomme; and Robert Catrini as Turner’s attorney, Colonel Bob Moorcroft. There were two performances that really caught my attention, but for different reasons. Robert Knepper, of whom I am usually a fan, seemed a bit over-the-top to me as a military contractor named former General James Harkness. On the other hand, I was very impressed by Danika Yarosh’s performance as the embittered adolescent Samantha Dayton, who may or may not be Reacher’s biological daughter.

Well . . . I cannot dictate the opinions of movie critics or any filmgoers. I can express my own view of “JACK REACHER: NEVER GO BACK”. And although I feel that the movie’s beginning was a little shaky about Jack Reacher’s acquaintance with Susan Turner, I cannot deny that overall, I was very impressed with the film. And I believe that Edward Zwick’s top-notch direction, along with a pretty solid script and a talented cast led by Tom Cruise, made this movie just as enjoyable as its 2012 predecessor.